Productivity

Moleskine, Field Notes & The Midori Travelers Notebook

NotebooksI am an analog snob. I have tried going digital on several occasions and every time I find myself grabbing a notebook and pen as I walk out the door. I’ve been quite particular about my analog tools the way some are particular about the car they drive or the PC they buy. I’ve had this issue for years, I remember getting ahold of a PaperMate fine point stick pen that I’ve never been able to find since the fifth grade. My search isn’t over either.

I’ve upgraded my choices since the Mrs. Kauffman’s class but, the passion remains. Currently I am writing with either a Lamy Safari fountain pen with an Extra-Fine nib or a Retro 51 Tornado – Lincoln edition rollerball pen. This lineup will soon be changing. I am going to try the Lamy rollerball pen, which will house the same refill as my Retro 51 but, will weigh less and is a special edition CopperOrange colored aluminum pen. I’m stoked about it.

What I’d like to really dive into is paper. Working for a Fortune 500 company has its positives and also its negatives. A major, turn my nose up at, moment I experienced was opening the supply closet to find the worst paper products sold. Not only is it Saran Wrap thin, it also allows my ink to bleed through as if I were using gauze to fix a busted copper pipe. I nevertheless shut the closet doors turned to the “Keeper of the Keys” and thanked her for the time. I would use my own materials for work.

I’ve carried the same notebook system since 2009. Having carried around a Franklin Planner for years I gave it up a in 2006. I bounced around different systems, many self created, until in late 2009 I came across the blog Scription by Patrick Ng and was inspired to go with a minimal system called the Midori Traveler’s Notebook (MTN).Midori Traveler's Notebook

The MTN is a simple and minimal approach, a leather cover with an elastic band in the spine to hold a blank, lined or grid notebook specifically made for the MTN system and an elastic band around the middle to hold it closed. With the addition of a second band inside, you can add two more notebooks to the interior and carry multiple notebooks. I carry a personal journal, a work notebook and a reading notebook in mine. Researching online revealed a number of systems one could come up with but, with me being a struggling practitioner of minimalism I find this a near perfect system.

The Midori notebooks are made with a thicker paper that accepts rollerball and fountain pen ink alike. There is little to no bleed through and because of the size (11 x 21 cm) there is enough room for me to really write. Staple bound with a simple Kraft paper stock cover the notebooks are quality notebooks for the price, just under $6 a notebook.

The initial expense of the Midori Traveler’s Notebook can be a turn off for some. The notebooks themselves can be purchased relatively cheap however the leather cover is a one time purchase that some people have a difficult time swallowing. It sells for roughly $57.00 and depending on where you live is only available online. I get a lot of interest in my MTN when out and typically after I’ve explained this to someone I get the question, “wouldn’t those black notebooks you see in Target or Barnes & Noble do?”

MoleskinesThose “black notebooks” happen to be the ever popularly marketed Moleskine resurrected from days gone by. The same notebooks used by the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Bruce Chatwin. The once French – made pocket notebooks were brought back to life in 1997 by a Milanese company and have become one of the most popular notebooks around. I have a love/hate relationship with the Moleskine. I think what the company has done with these once basic notebooks is impressive. Originally only found in a pocket size version these notebooks have grown in variety not only in size but color and design. Today you can see the images of the Peanuts, Star Wars, and even Batman grace the covers of the notebooks adding a certain flair and individuality to them.

I’ve owned and continue to own them for various purposes. The tiny Volant series notebooks are perfect to track my mileage and car repairs in. In between the Franklin Planner and my MTN I was using Moleskine exclusively. They are readily available within and in an assortment of colors and sizes, hard bound and soft bound. The convenience makes it difficult not to pick the up if you are someone who writes regularly.

Functionally speaking the notebooks are well manufactured. I’ve never had any issues with binding or loose pages. They are structurally sound, however, my problem lies with the paper. I cannot write in them using my most often carried pens. The ink bleeds through and makes writing on the opposite side annoying at best. In the interest of frugality, last month I cut a Moleskine down to fit in my MTN and have been eagerly waiting for the time the notebook is finally full and can be replaced by a new one. The experience is just that annoying. I am a self admitted paper snob, just as any Apple loyalist would be if you asked them to use a Droid.

If Moleskine would change the paper they use in these notebooks I would, in all likelihood go back to them exclusively. I really like the look and feel of them and as of late am getting annoyed with the multiple notebook’d Midori. Writing in my personal journal is a minor wrestling match holding back the top notebook while at the same time writing. and, because there are several notebooks in the system I am never writing on a flat surface. I’ve gotten to the point where I am once again looking for something new.

Field Notes Cherry WoodI am for a while going to try the Field Notes brand of notebooks. I have tried these in the past but was unhappy with the edition I had purchased. Field Notes come in a standard edition with a brown Kraft paper cover and a seasonal edition which come in and unknown color scheme. The ever changing seasonal editions are some of the most coveted notebooks on the planet to a group called the Field Nuts, selling for as much as $300 on eBay for three notebooks.

FieldNotes are small pocket notebooks that are quick and convenient. I can carry one in my pocket without even knowing it’s there. Measuring only 3.5″ x 5.5″ with only 48 pages within they are what I call a working notebook. A Field Notes is not going to be used as a commonplace book, nor would you want to use as a journal. They are just too small for such writing. But, everyday notes, lists, thoughts, measurements, these are the perfect size. The paper is good and they are priced well at $9.95 for a sack of three notebooks.

Well, whatever the size that is right for you there is probably a notebook out there. Notebooks like most things are a matter of choice. Moleskin just happen to have the market currently and thus their popularity. I don’t think analog tools in the US has enough of a draw to get many of the other big names pushing the marketing of their paper, yet! I think with the likes of Brad Dowdy (The Pen Addict), Ed Jelley (edjelley.com), Mike Dudek (The Clicky Post), the folks at The Field Notes and countless others are having an impact on the analog tools we know and love, will help ignite the passion these tools once had in our cultures’ lives.

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